Winter Whiff

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During the cold winter months I have noticed an increase in the problem of whiffy smelling cloth nappies.

Across social media mums plea for help to rid their nappies of the troublesome odour.  Advice came flooding in and includes strip washing or trying a bouquet of detergents.

This got me thinking, why is there this increase in this honky horror?  So with no scientific evidence and no kitchen sink science experiment I’ve come to the conclusion that it is winter itself that is the cause of the whiff epidemic sweeping country.

Cold, damp, wet and short days are all typical of the British winter, making drying cloth nappies more challenging.

We use pulleys, airing cupboards, clothes horses, tumble dryers and even radiators (against all advice – of course).  Any method to get those nappies dry during this damp season.

These methods might work, although they often leave slightly crispy nappies –  but could they be the cause of the offending stink

Drying indoors means fresh air isn’t circulating around the individual fibres, the fibres lie dormant drying slowly and trapping in nasty odours.  What about tumble driers?  Yes a tumble drier circulates the air but it isn’t fresh air and the driers themselves can smell dank.

So how do we solve these winter wiffs?  RAIN is the answer,  natures best fabric softener and deodoriser, and it’s abundant in the winter, especially in my home – Scotland.

To banish those nasty niffs – just hang your cloth nappies, cloth wipes, inserts and liners in the rain and forget about them if possible for 24-48 hours.  Then dry as normal.

To optimise you odour elimination you can also try adding and extra rise cycle, freshen your washing machine with a cup of white vinegar or try a washing machine cleaner such as Little Violets Washing Machine Cleaner.

For more advice on washing your nappies visit the http://www.uknappynetwork.org/washing-guide.html

Real Nappy Week – Make A Change

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Real Nappy Week 2016

18th-24th April

Celebrating Change

The theme of the 20th Real Nappy Week is change and it has really got me thinking about the change from cloth to disposable and the journey back to cloth.

I was a cloth-bummed child of the 70s, my mum washed in a twin-tub and line dried all our nappies, as her mother had before her. So from then there was a quiet revolution and out went the cloth and in came the paper, plastic and macrogels. Hydrogels are a new material allowing nappies to hold even more urine.

The 70s was a time of great change for women. Many were going back to work after having children. There was more opportunity for women in the workplace and there was greater mobility, so young families often didn’t have the support of an extended family.

It was in this atmosphere of change that the disposable nappy first took hold. Mums didn’t want to be perceived as being chained to the kitchen sink, and this was a product of convenience. As demand grew, prices fell. With big brands producing disposables, marketing budgets were huge and by the 1980’s, in an era of excess, the disposable nappy had eclipsed cloth.

The change from cloth to disposable had been seamless, but in the early 90s, as we left behind the throw-away attitude of the 80s, a new era was dawning. The environment dominated the media, and from this families started to think about the future of their children.

Cloth nappies quickly evolved to cater for the growing market and the terries and nappy pins were soon to be joined by funky coloured nappies that fastened with applix and poppers.   Most households had washers and dryers – white goods our parents and grandparents would have given anything to own when they were scrubbing nappies by hand!

So why change?

By using cloth nappies families can make huge savings of anywhere from £100 -£1000 and the more children you have in cloth the bigger the saving.

By choosing cloth over single use nappies families could make up to a 40% carbon saving.

Currently UK families send 355,000 tons of single use nappies to landfill each year, costing local authorities and tax payers, £32 million a year.

Something has to change!

What to change?

Changing Habits: We have become accustom to buying and binning, we need to change our mindset. Buy, reuse, recycle!

Changing Lives: Cloth is comfortable, dry and cushioned making for a happy baby and by reducing landfill you are making for a happier future for everyone.

Changing Futures: Change a habit of a generation and spread the word!

The Nappy Laundry Company will have discounts on cloth throughout Real Nappy Week 2016.

Why I am still called The Nappy Laundry.

logoIn January this year I took the decision to close the nappy laundry side of my business after 8 years.

Over the 8 years I have enabled families across the North-east to use cloth nappies.  Some families used the service from birth to potty training for one child, some for multiple children and some used the service to get them through difficult or busy period in their lives. But as access to cloth nappies has increased and they have become easier to use and launder the demand for the service decreased.

So there it is: The Nappy Laundry Company no longer offers laundry services.

Many people have asked me if I am keeping my name and the answer is YES!  The Nappy Laundry has been around for 8 years and has become a recognised name.  We still offer cloth nappies that you launder and a range of fantastic laundry products.

Over two years ago I successfully branched out into babywearing products.  For the past two years The Nappy Laundry Company has been the only business in the North-east to offer a wide range of carriers and consultancy.  As this market has expanded I have recently been joined by a number of other consultants in Aberdeen as well as a the NCT sling library.  These are exciting times for babywearing and I hope this new explosion of services will raise interest and in turn help raise the profile of The Nappy Laundry Company’s baby carrying consultancy services.

My logo for The Nappy Laundry shows a baby in a sling so I decided that I would keep both my logo and name. It’s an exciting time in cloth nappies and babywearing and I look forward to continuing to help new parents on their journey.

I hope you can join me too.